Agenda and minutes

Venue: Council Chamber, Civic Centre

Contact: Lisa Thornett  (01279) 446185

Items
No. Item

41.

Minutes Silence

Minutes:

A minute silence was observed for the tragedy in Pittsburgh and Leicester City.

 

42.

Apologies for Absence

Minutes:

Apologies for absence were received from Councillors Tony Durcan, Tony Edwards, Michael Hardware, Shona Johnson, Sue Livings, Russell Perrin, Edna Stevens and Chris Vince.

43.

Declarations of Interest

Councillors’ declarations of interest (if any) in relation to any items on the agenda.

Minutes:

None.

44.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 204 KB

To agree the minutes of the meeting held on 20 September 2018.

Minutes:

RESOLVED that the minutes of the meeting held on 20 September 2018 are agreed as a correct record and signed by the Chair.

45.

Communications from the Chair

Minutes:

The Chair outlined various events she had attended and in particular drew attention to the visit from the High Sherriff of Essex, her Civic Service, and the celebration of the Royal Navy’s 60th anniversary and the opening of Newhall Primary school.

 

The Chair also advised that on Friday 2 November 2018 at 2pm, there would be an opening of the ‘Fazackerley Hide’ at the Nature Reserve in memory of Darren Fazackerley, who passed away last year. All Councillors are welcome to attend.  

46.

Petitions from the Public

Minutes:

None.

47.

Questions from the Public pdf icon PDF 63 KB

Minutes:

The question together with the answer is appended to the minutes.

48.

Questions from Councillors

Minutes:

None

49.

Motions from Councillors

49a

Adoption of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance Definition of Anti-Semitism

Proposed by Councillor Lanie Shears (seconded by Councillor Andrew Johnson):

 

This Council deplores anti-Semitism in all its forms and therefore adopts the definition of anti-Semitism as set out by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance in full and without amendment; and in doing so pledges to combat this pernicious form of racism:

 

‘“Anti-Semitism is a certain perception of Jews, which may be expressed as hatred toward Jews. Rhetorical and physical manifestations of anti-Semitism are directed toward Jewish or non-Jewish individuals and/or their property, toward Jewish community institutions and religious facilities.”

 

To guide IHRA in its work, the following examples may serve as illustrations:
 
Manifestations might include the targeting of the state of Israel, conceived as a Jewish collectivity. However, criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as anti-Semitic. Anti-Semitism frequently charges Jews with conspiring to harm humanity, and it is often used to blame Jews for “why things go wrong.” It is expressed in speech, writing, visual forms and action, and employs sinister stereotypes and negative character traits.
 
Contemporary examples of anti-Semitism in public life, the media, schools, the workplace, and in the religious sphere could, taking into account the overall context, include, but are not limited to:

 

·         Calling for, aiding, or justifying the killing or harming of Jews in the name of a radical ideology or an extremist view of religion.

 

·         Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions.

 

·         Accusing Jews as a people of being responsible for real or imagined wrongdoing committed by a single Jewish person or group, or even for acts committed by non-Jews.

 

·         Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust).

 

·         Accusing the Jews as a people, or Israel as a state, of inventing or exaggerating the Holocaust.

 

·         Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations.

 

·         Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination, e.g., by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour.

 

·         Applying double standards by requiring of it a behaviour not expected or demanded of any other democratic nation.

 

·         Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g., claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis.

 

·         Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis.

 

·         Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the state of Israel.

 

Anti-Semitic acts are criminal when they are so defined by law (for example, denial of the Holocaust or distribution of anti-Semitic materials in some countries).
 
Criminal acts are anti-Semitic when the targets of attacks, whether they  ...  view the full agenda text for item 49a

Minutes:

Proposed by Councillor Lanie Shears (seconded by Councillor Andrew Johnson):

 

This Council deplores anti-Semitism in all its forms and therefore adopts the definition of anti-Semitism as set out by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance in full and without amendment; and in doing so pledges to combat this pernicious form of racism:

 

‘“Anti-Semitism is a certain perception of Jews, which may be expressed as hatred toward Jews. Rhetorical and physical manifestations of anti-Semitism are directed toward Jewish or non-Jewish individuals and/or their property, toward Jewish community institutions and religious facilities.”

 

To guide IHRA in its work, the following examples may serve as illustrations:
 
Manifestations might include the targeting of the state of Israel, conceived as a Jewish collectivity. However, criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as anti-Semitic. Anti-Semitism frequently charges Jews with conspiring to harm humanity, and it is often used to blame Jews for “why things go wrong.” It is expressed in speech, writing, visual forms and action, and employs sinister stereotypes and negative character traits.
 
Contemporary examples of anti-Semitism in public life, the media, schools, the workplace, and in the religious sphere could, taking into account the overall context, include, but are not limited to:

 

·         Calling for, aiding, or justifying the killing or harming of Jews in the name of a radical ideology or an extremist view of religion.

 

·         Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions.

 

·         Accusing Jews as a people of being responsible for real or imagined wrongdoing committed by a single Jewish person or group, or even for acts committed by non-Jews.

 

·         Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust).

 

·         Accusing the Jews as a people, or Israel as a state, of inventing or exaggerating the Holocaust.

 

·         Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations.

 

·         Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination, e.g., by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour.

 

·         Applying double standards by requiring of it a behaviour not expected or demanded of any other democratic nation.

 

·         Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g., claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis.

 

·         Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis.

 

·         Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the state of Israel.

 

Anti-Semitic acts are criminal when they are so defined by law (for example, denial of the Holocaust or distribution of anti-Semitic materials in some countries).
 
Criminal acts are anti-Semitic when the targets of attacks, whether they  ...  view the full minutes text for item 49a

49b

Pensions for Women Born in the 1950's

Proposed by Councillor Lanie Shears (seconded by Councillor Mark Ingall):

 

This Council calls upon Esther McVey, Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and the Government to make fair transitional state pension arrangements for all women born on or after 6th April 1950, who have unfairly borne the burden of the increase to the State Pension Age with lack of appropriate notification.


Hundreds of thousands of women had significant pension changes imposed on them by the Pensions Acts of 1995 and 2011 with little or no personal notification of the changes. Some women had only two years notice of a six-year increase to their state pension age. Many women born in the 1950s are living in hardship as a result.

This Council calls upon Esther McVey, Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and the Government to reconsider transitional arrangements for women born on or after 6 April 1950, so that a phased and fair implementation ensures that women do not live in hardship due to pension changes they were not told about until it was too late to make alternative arrangements.

Minutes:

Proposed by Councillor Lanie Shears (seconded by Councillor Mark Ingall):

 

This Council calls upon Esther McVey, Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and the Government to make fair transitional state pension arrangements for all women born on or after 6th April 1950, who have unfairly borne the burden of the increase to the State Pension Age with lack of appropriate notification.


Hundreds of thousands of women had significant pension changes imposed on them by the Pensions Acts of 1995 and 2011 with little or no personal notification of the changes. Some women had only two years notice of a six-year increase to their state pension age. Many women born in the 1950s are living in hardship as a result.

This Council calls upon Esther McVey, Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and the Government to reconsider transitional arrangements for women born on or after 6 April 1950, so that a phased and fair implementation ensures that women do not live in hardship due to pension changes they were not told about until it was too late to make alternative arrangements.

 

A vote on the motion was recorded. The details of the recorded vote are below.

 

The motion was carried.

Recorded Vote
TitleTypeRecorded Vote textResult
Pensions for women Born in the 1950's Motion Carried
  • View Recorded Vote for this item
  • 49c

    Permitted Development

    Proposed by Councillor Mark Ingall (seconded by Councillor John Strachan):

     

    Changes to planning legislation in May 2013 has allowed the conversion of offices to residential accommodation through what is known as 'permitted development' and these conversions do not therefore require the permission of the local planning authority.

     

    In Harlow, this policy change has had unfortunate implications and disproportionate effects. Our town was deliberately planned to separate industrial and employment activity from residential areas. This was one way in which Gibberd sought to deliver quality homes and neighbourhoods to live in, with access to green space.

     

    The consequences of this change have led to:

     

    ·         A large quantum of office to residential conversions in our town centre which has put significant additional pressure on the Police and other public services in Harlow.

     

    ·         A loss of business accommodation in our employment areas meaning that we are unable to attract new office based businesses or cater for our own growing businesses that cannot be accommodated in the Science Park.

     

    ·         The creation of a resident population, including families with children, who are living in industrial areas with poor access to education and health services, shops, utilities , public transport and decent amenities and safe play and green space that we expect in our residential neighbourhoods. We are also concerned about the risks posed to residents in these localities where there will be significantly higher heavy goods vehicle movements, congestion and poor air quality which may have health and safety impacts.

    Such is the quantum of existing conversions (in excess of 1,000 housing units) that this Council believes that there should now be a moratorium on any further such developments in Harlow and will seek to achieve this through our dialogue with the Government.

     

    This Council will also pursue additional applications for Article 4 Directions which would mean any such proposed conversions would need to apply through the normal planning process and enable the local authority to exercise its powers in relation to location and quality of any conversions.

    Minutes:

    Proposed by Councillor Mark Ingall (seconded by Councillor John Strachan):

     

    Changes to planning legislation in May 2013 has allowed the conversion of offices to residential accommodation through what is known as 'permitted development' and these conversions do not therefore require the permission of the local planning authority.

     

    In Harlow, this policy change has had unfortunate implications and disproportionate effects. Our town was deliberately planned to separate industrial and employment activity from residential areas. This was one way in which Gibberd sought to deliver quality homes and neighbourhoods to live in, with access to green space.

     

    The consequences of this change have led to:

     

    ·         A large quantum of office to residential conversions in our town centre which has put significant additional pressure on the Police and other public services in Harlow.

     

    ·         A loss of business accommodation in our employment areas meaning that we are unable to attract new office based businesses or cater for our own growing businesses that cannot be accommodated in the Science Park.

     

    ·         The creation of a resident population, including families with children, who are living in industrial areas with poor access to education and health services, shops, utilities , public transport and decent amenities and safe play and green space that we expect in our residential neighbourhoods. We are also concerned about the risks posed to residents in these localities where there will be significantly higher heavy goods vehicle movements, congestion and poor air quality which may have health and safety impacts.

    Such is the quantum of existing conversions (in excess of 1,000 housing units) that this Council believes that there should now be a moratorium on any further such developments in Harlow and will seek to achieve this through our dialogue with the Government.

     

    This Council will also pursue additional applications for Article 4 Directions which would mean any such proposed conversions would need to apply through the normal planning process and enable the local authority to exercise its powers in relation to location and quality of any conversions.

     

    Councillor Simon Carter, seconded by Councillor Andrew Johnson, proposed the following amendment:

     

    At the end of the fifth paragraph delete the words, “will seek to achieve this through our dialogue with the Government.”

     

    And substitute:

     

    “Will work with Robert Halfon MP, to secure:

     

    1.    A block on any further conversions of offices located in employment areas;

     

    2.    Introduction of a mandatory protocol for the notification of individuals and families in need to the receiving authority(ies), along with the funds to provide that care;

     

    3.    To bring the existing conversions within the planning system to ensure they comply with local requirements;

     

    4.    Developments must be obliged to meet basic requirements to ensure that they are fit for inhabitance taking into account amenity areas for children, transport connections and close proximity to facilities.”

     

    The amendment was debated and a vote was taken. The amendment was lost and the original motion continued to be the substantive motion.

     

    The motion was carried.

     

     

    50.

    References from Cabinet and Committees

    Minutes:

    None.

    51.

    Reports from Officers

    51a

    Appointment of Member Champion

    To appoint Councillor Tony Durcan as the Member Champion for Mental Health.

    Minutes:

    Proposed by Councillor Mark Ingall and seconded by Councillor Mark Wilkinson.

     

    RESOLVED that Councillor Tony Durcan be appointed as the Member Champion for Mental Health.

    52.

    Minutes of Cabinet and Committee Meetings

    To note the following Cabinet and Committee minutes:

    Minutes:

    RESOLVED that the minutes of the following meetings are noted.

    52a

    Minutes of meeting Tuesday, 11 September 2018 of Licensing Committee pdf icon PDF 50 KB

    52b

    Minutes of meeting Thursday, 13 September 2018 of Cabinet pdf icon PDF 167 KB

    52c

    Minutes of meeting Tuesday, 16 October 2018 of Scrutiny Committee pdf icon PDF 190 KB

    52d

    Minutes of meeting Wednesday, 17 October 2018 of Development Management Committee pdf icon PDF 185 KB

    52e

    Minutes of meeting Thursday, 18 October 2018 of Cabinet pdf icon PDF 257 KB

    53.

    Matters of Urgent Business

    Minutes:

    None.